First Ambulatory Treatment Recommended for COVID-19 in Canada

Renown internationally for its nihilistic therapeutic approach to COVID-19, denying any outpatient care to its citizens, Canada only treats the disease in hospitals, with disastrous consequences, including hospital overcrowding and triage by unaccountable administrators. That was until the province of British Columbia (BC) updated its treatment guidelines on April 18th.

(see French version)

There is now a “crack” in the infamous Canadian system, and hopefully, other provinces will imitate BC, even if the BC guidelines clearly remain unsatisfactory compared to the best practices for early outpatient treatment, as implemented in other jurisdictions, outside Canada.

What’s new in these guidelines? Two drugs appeared in the category “Mildly Ill COVID-19 Patients – Ambulatory Outpatient, long-term care.”

The drugs are inhaled budesonide and colchicine. The new additions to the provincial guidelines read as follow:

“In adults with mildly ill COVID-19 aged 65 and over OR aged 50 and over with underlying health conditions and within 14 days of symptom onset, inhaled budesonide 800 μg twice daily for 14 days may be considered on a case by case basis in discussion with the patient by clearly highlighting the uncertainty in the benefit of treatment, and the risks and potential adverse effects. Informed consent should be obtained and treatment initiated as soon as possible. Underlying health conditions include weakened immune system due to illness or medication; heart disease and/or hypertension; chronic lung disease; diabetes; hepatic impairment; stroke or other neurological condition; obesity or BMI above 35.”

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“In patients aged 40 years or older with PCR-confirmed COVID-19 who have at least one risk factor† and no contraindications††, colchicine 0.6 mg PO BID x 3 days, then 0.6 mg daily x 27 days may be considered on a case-by-case basis in discussion with the patient by clearly highlighting the uncertainty in the benefit of treatment, and the risks and potential adverse effects. Informed consent should be obtained and treatment initiated as soon as possible.”

These are two drugs we covered extensively on covexit.com.  See for example this article about budesonide.

The drugs have been used for Covid-19 for about a year, in other jurisdictions. See for example these videos, featuring Dr Richard Bartlett from Texas, who is a pioneer in using inhaled budesonide for COVID-19 outpatient treatment.

For an understanding of how these drugs can be best used in an outpatient protocol, watch our webinar with Professor Peter McCullough, MD, MPH.

Also visit: https://budesonideworks.com/

To be noted is that there was a short-lived attempt to introduce an hydroxychloroquine / azythromycin outpatient treatment in New-Brunswick. Shorly after its launch, it was put indefinitely on the backburner.

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See the guidelines in attachment.

Source: http://www.bccdc.ca/

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